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Title

Prevalence, Distribution, and Correlates of Hepatitis C Virus Infection Among Homeless Adults in Los Angeles (Public Health Reports)

Publication Topics

Chronic Condition Prevalence; Health Behaviors; Low-Income; Urban/Rural Populations; Adult

Publication Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

2012-08-01T07:00:00Z

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<a onclick="OpenPopUpPage('http://healthpolicy.ucla.edu/_layouts/listform.aspx?PageType=4&ListId={7AAD61FA-4BCB-48C0-B0B7-87AFDC3673EF}&ID=487&RootFolder=*', RefreshPage); return false;" href="http://healthpolicy.ucla.edu/_layouts/listform.aspx?PageType=4&ListId={7AAD61FA-4BCB-48C0-B0B7-87AFDC3673EF}&ID=487&RootFolder=*">Lillian Gelberg, MD, MSPH</a>

Author 2

<a onclick="OpenPopUpPage('http://healthpolicy.ucla.edu/_layouts/listform.aspx?PageType=4&ListId={7AAD61FA-4BCB-48C0-B0B7-87AFDC3673EF}&ID=151&RootFolder=*', RefreshPage); return false;" href="http://healthpolicy.ucla.edu/_layouts/listform.aspx?PageType=4&ListId={7AAD61FA-4BCB-48C0-B0B7-87AFDC3673EF}&ID=151&RootFolder=*">et al</a>

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Abstract

Recent government studies show that hepatitis C, which can destroy the liver and necessitate a liver transplant, now kills more American adults than AIDS, and research led by Center Faculty Associate Lillian Gelberg shows just how prevalent the disease is among homeless adults in downtown Los Angeles.

In this study published in Public Health Reports, researchers found that 26.7 percent of homeless adults tested and surveyed in downtown Los Angeles' skid row were infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) — more than 10 times the 2 percent rate among the general U.S. population. Of those surveyed, 46.1 percent were unaware that they were infected. Four percent of the sample were HIV-positive.

Few of the infected homeless adults surveyed had ever received any treatment for their HCV. Less than 3 percent of those who knew they were infected had ever been treated.

The study surveyed 534 homeless adults from 41 shelters and meal programs in the skid row area between June 2003 and February 2004.

Most were males and the majority were African Americans. Each was tested for hepatitis B and C and for HIV.
Overall, the researchers found that HCV prevalence was significantly higher among those homeless individuals who had injected drugs or been in prison; who were 40 years of age and older; who had less education; or who were U.S.-born.​

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Created at 8/30/2012 9:22 AM by i:0#.f|uclachissqlmembershipprovider|jonathan
Last modified at 1/10/2013 3:30 PM by i:0#.f|uclachissqlmembershipprovider|jonathan