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Title

Perceived and Objectively-Measured Neighborhood Violence and Adolescent Psychological Distress (Journal of Urban Health)

Publication Topics

California Health Interview Survey; 2011 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS 2011); 2012 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS 2012); 2013 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS 2013); 2014 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS 2014); Adolescents/Children; Injury and Violence Prevention; Mental and Emotional Health

Publication Type

CHIS Journal Article

Publication Date

2016-09-07T07:00:00Z

Author 1

<a onclick="OpenPopUpPage('http://healthpolicy.ucla.edu/_layouts/listform.aspx?PageType=4&ListId={7AAD61FA-4BCB-48C0-B0B7-87AFDC3673EF}&ID=1397&RootFolder=*', RefreshPage); return false;" href="http://healthpolicy.ucla.edu/_layouts/listform.aspx?PageType=4&ListId={7AAD61FA-4BCB-48C0-B0B7-87AFDC3673EF}&ID=1397&RootFolder=*">Sidra Goldman-Mellor</a>

Author 2

<a onclick="OpenPopUpPage('http://healthpolicy.ucla.edu/_layouts/listform.aspx?PageType=4&ListId={7AAD61FA-4BCB-48C0-B0B7-87AFDC3673EF}&ID=151&RootFolder=*', RefreshPage); return false;" href="http://healthpolicy.ucla.edu/_layouts/listform.aspx?PageType=4&ListId={7AAD61FA-4BCB-48C0-B0B7-87AFDC3673EF}&ID=151&RootFolder=*">et al</a>

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Abstract

​Prior research examining links between neighborhood violence and mental health has not been able to establish whether it is perceived levels of neighborhood violence, or actual levels of violent crime, that matter most for adolescents' psychological well-being.

In this study, authors ascertained both perceived neighborhood safety and objectively-measured neighborhood-level violent crime (using a novel geospatial index of police-reported crime incidents) for 4,464 adolescent respondents from the California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) for 2011 to 2014. Propensity score-matched regression models were used to examine associations between these measures and CHIS adolescents' symptoms of psychological distress. Authors found adolescents who perceived their neighborhood to be unsafe were two times more likely than those who perceived their neighborhood to be safe to report serious psychological distress. Adolescents who lived in areas objectively characterized by high levels of violent crime, however, were no more likely than their peers in safer areas to be distressed.
 
Findings suggest that, at the population level, adolescents' perceptions of neighborhood violence, rather than objective levels of neighborhood crime, are most salient for their mental health.

 

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Journal Article: Perceived and Objectively-Measured Neighborhood Violence and Adolescent Psychological Distress (Journal of Urban Health)

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Press Release

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California Health Interview Survey (CHIS)

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Created at 11/17/2016 11:16 AM by i:0#.f|uclachissqlmembershipprovider|celeste
Last modified at 11/17/2016 1:02 PM by i:0#.f|uclachissqlmembershipprovider|celeste