Publications

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External Publication
In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the U.S. government enacted historic relief programs, including multiple instances of direct cash payments to a majority of U.S. families. Those federal policies coincided with California health insurance reforms that, while developed before the pandemic, were implemented in 2020.
External Publication
In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the U.S. government enacted historic relief programs, including multiple instances of direct cash payments to a majority of U.S. families. Those federal policies coincided with California health insurance reforms that, while developed before the pandemic, were implemented in 2020.
Research Report
This publication represents the 20th anniversary of the State of Health Insurance in California (SHIC) report series. It is the 10th installment of the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research’s ongoing, in-depth study of the overall outlook for health insurance coverage in our state.
Research Report
This publication represents the 20th anniversary of the State of Health Insurance in California (SHIC) report series. It is the 10th installment of the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research’s ongoing, in-depth study of the overall outlook for health insurance coverage in our state.
Journal Article
The number of Californians covered by Medi-Cal increased more than 50% between 2013 and 2018, largely due to expansion under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). This rapid expansion of Medicaid rolls prompted concerns that Medi-Cal enrollees would face greater difficulty accessing health care.
Journal Article
The number of Californians covered by Medi-Cal increased more than 50% between 2013 and 2018, largely due to expansion under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). This rapid expansion of Medicaid rolls prompted concerns that Medi-Cal enrollees would face greater difficulty accessing health care.
External Publication
Medi-Cal, California’s Medicaid program, is the state’s health insurance program for Californians with low incomes, including nearly 4 in 10 children, one in five nonelderly adults, and two million seniors and people with disabilities. It also pays for more than 50% of all births in the state and 55% of all patient days in long-term care facilities. In total, over 13 million Californians — one in three — rely on the program for health coverage.
External Publication
Medi-Cal, California’s Medicaid program, is the state’s health insurance program for Californians with low incomes, including nearly 4 in 10 children, one in five nonelderly adults, and two million seniors and people with disabilities. It also pays for more than 50% of all births in the state and 55% of all patient days in long-term care facilities. In total, over 13 million Californians — one in three — rely on the program for health coverage.
Journal Article
Puerto Rico is a U.S. territory and a popular destination for Latino immigrants in the Caribbean. Even with few language and cultural barriers, however, many Latino immigrants in Puerto Rico are uninsured. Using data from the 2014–2019 Puerto Rico Community Survey, authors examined inequities in health insurance coverage for non-Puerto Rican Latinos ages 18-64 living in Puerto Rico according to citizenship status and Latino subgroup (Dominican, Cuban, Mexican, and other Latino).
Journal Article
Puerto Rico is a U.S. territory and a popular destination for Latino immigrants in the Caribbean. Even with few language and cultural barriers, however, many Latino immigrants in Puerto Rico are uninsured. Using data from the 2014–2019 Puerto Rico Community Survey, authors examined inequities in health insurance coverage for non-Puerto Rican Latinos ages 18-64 living in Puerto Rico according to citizenship status and Latino subgroup (Dominican, Cuban, Mexican, and other Latino).
Journal Article
Puerto Rico is a U.S. territory and a popular destination for Latino immigrants in the Caribbean. Even with few language and cultural barriers, however, many Latino immigrants in Puerto Rico are uninsured. Using data from the 2014–2019 Puerto Rico Community Survey, authors examined inequities in health insurance coverage for non-Puerto Rican Latinos ages 18-64 living in Puerto Rico according to citizenship status and Latino subgroup (Dominican, Cuban, Mexican, and other Latino).
Journal Article
Puerto Rico is a U.S. territory and a popular destination for Latino immigrants in the Caribbean. Even with few language and cultural barriers, however, many Latino immigrants in Puerto Rico are uninsured. Using data from the 2014–2019 Puerto Rico Community Survey, authors examined inequities in health insurance coverage for non-Puerto Rican Latinos ages 18-64 living in Puerto Rico according to citizenship status and Latino subgroup (Dominican, Cuban, Mexican, and other Latino).
Journal Article
In this study, researchers aimed to investigate health care access and utilization among patients with limited English proficiency (LEP). A total of 21,177 participants were included with 8.2% having LEP. Findings: Compared to participants with proficient English, LEP participants were less likely to have a usual place to go to when sick other than the ER or have a preventive care visit in the past year after adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics.
Journal Article
In this study, researchers aimed to investigate health care access and utilization among patients with limited English proficiency (LEP). A total of 21,177 participants were included with 8.2% having LEP. Findings: Compared to participants with proficient English, LEP participants were less likely to have a usual place to go to when sick other than the ER or have a preventive care visit in the past year after adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics.
Journal Article
In this study, researchers aimed to investigate health care access and utilization among patients with limited English proficiency (LEP). A total of 21,177 participants were included with 8.2% having LEP. Findings: Compared to participants with proficient English, LEP participants were less likely to have a usual place to go to when sick other than the ER or have a preventive care visit in the past year after adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics.
Journal Article
In this study, researchers aimed to investigate health care access and utilization among patients with limited English proficiency (LEP). A total of 21,177 participants were included with 8.2% having LEP. Findings: Compared to participants with proficient English, LEP participants were less likely to have a usual place to go to when sick other than the ER or have a preventive care visit in the past year after adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics.
Journal Article
This study identifies whether culturally based differences in perceptions of health resulted in differences in ambulatory care use among the elderly.  Methods: The authors conducted stratified Poisson regressions on data from a 1992 survey of older Koreans and Whites in Los Angeles County. The models included measures of demographics, health, functioning, income, insurance, social support, and culture (perceptions of health or other beliefs).  Results: Descriptive findings showed older Koreans
Journal Article
This study identifies whether culturally based differences in perceptions of health resulted in differences in ambulatory care use among the elderly.  Methods: The authors conducted stratified Poisson regressions on data from a 1992 survey of older Koreans and Whites in Los Angeles County. The models included measures of demographics, health, functioning, income, insurance, social support, and culture (perceptions of health or other beliefs).  Results: Descriptive findings showed older Koreans
Journal Article
This study identifies whether culturally based differences in perceptions of health resulted in differences in ambulatory care use among the elderly.  Methods: The authors conducted stratified Poisson regressions on data from a 1992 survey of older Koreans and Whites in Los Angeles County. The models included measures of demographics, health, functioning, income, insurance, social support, and culture (perceptions of health or other beliefs).  Results: Descriptive findings showed older Koreans
Journal Article
This study identifies whether culturally based differences in perceptions of health resulted in differences in ambulatory care use among the elderly.  Methods: The authors conducted stratified Poisson regressions on data from a 1992 survey of older Koreans and Whites in Los Angeles County. The models included measures of demographics, health, functioning, income, insurance, social support, and culture (perceptions of health or other beliefs).  Results: Descriptive findings showed older Koreans