UCLA CHPR evaluated the Health Homes Program, which provided care management and other services to eligible Medi-Cal beneficiaries in 12 counties.

The Health Economics and Evaluation Research (HEER) Program at the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, led by Center Associate Director Nadereh Pourat, PhD, was selected to lead the evaluation of the California Department of Health Care Services’ Medi-Cal Health Homes Program (HHP). Authorized under California Assembly Bill 361 and approved by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services under Section 2703 of the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, HHP was implemented to serve eligible Medi-Cal Managed Care Health Plan (MCP) members with complex needs, including individuals with chronic conditions and high levels of service utilization.

HHP was implemented starting July 2018 in 12 counties across California. The program was run by managed care plans that directly provided HHP services or contracted with community-based care management entities to deliver HHP services. HHP services included comprehensive care coordination (physical health, behavioral health and community based long-term supportive services), health promotion, and transitional care.

The HEER Program has released the first and second interim evaluation of HHP.

The final HHP evaluation report is currently in progress. The report is expected to be released in July 2023.

The Health Homes Program interim report findings show some promising improvements in how the program impacted service use, and will certainly help inform programs that serve patients who can benefit from various medical and social support services. These robust programs are vital in improving health care delivery and reducing cost expenditures.

Health Homes Program at a Glance

16

managed care plans implemented HHP, contracting with 263 community-based care management entities to deliver services  

90,045

individuals enrolled in HHP between July 2018 and December 2021

27%

of HHP enrollees were enrolled due to serious mental illness